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Thursday, April 23, 2015

Executive Function: An Essential Part of Early Childhood Brain Development - Free Talk in Littleton Thursday, May 7th

From The Discovery Museums Speaker Series

April 19, 2015

How does executive function develop in early childhood and what do we know about the environments which shape it?

Executive Function refers to a set of cognitive skills which are integral to our ability to focus on goals, stop ourselves from doing things we don't want to do, and can impact future success.

Margaret Sheridan, Ph.D.
Dr. Margaret Sheridan will speak about the brain processes which support the typical development of these skills. In addition, she will report on some recent research which investigates the impact of stressful environments on children’s brain development.

Light refreshments will be served, including hors d'oeuvres and desserts provided by Idylwilde Farms of Acton.

When:   6:30 - 8:30pm Thursday, May 7, 2015\

Where: First Church Unitarian
                   19 Foster Street, Littleton, MA

This event is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required. A wait list is expected.

Register HERE.

About Dr. Margaret Sheridan

Margaret Sheridan, Ph.D. received her degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. After completing her clinical internship at NYU Child Study Center/Bellevue Hospital, she spent three years as a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard School of Public Health and is now an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The goal of her research is to better understand the neural underpinnings of the development of cognitive control across childhood and to understand how and why disruption in this process results in psychopathology. Dr. Sheridan‘s work is characterized by rigorous and novel task design and cutting edge analytic approaches to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG).

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